Posts Tagged ‘Wales’

Patrick…

Born-Again Christian.

We know so much about this man mostly from the two books that he was able to write and have survived 1500 years to be re-printed many times. He tells us something of his life as a Roman Britain and his ignorance as a young man.

He tells us about his capture by Irish raiders and being sold into slavery, he goes on to tell us about the harshness of life before his conversion and after. An important area to mention in relation to the struggles of many believers today.

Patrick tells us about Celtic-Gael culture, his escape and his visions of needing to return to a people he would fall in love with. Patrick was indeed a great man, an even better believer, always emphasising the need of Salvation and personal repentance.

Patrick built five Christian centre and one missionary outreach centre, for those who would take the Gospel message to Cymru/Wales, Curnow/Cornwall, and Alba/Scotland.

Psalm 25:11,  John 3:15-17,  36,  Romans 11:5-6,  1 Corinthians 5:8-10,  Ephesians 2:7-8, 1 Timothy 1:15-16,  Hebrews 7:25,   1 John 5:11-12.

 

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A month of Saints. Part-One.

Saint David and Saint Piran.

1st March Cymru-Wales, 5th March Curnow-Cornwall.

Very little is known about these two men, but what an impact as Christian believers preaching the ‘Good News message they have had over the last 1500 years in the western regions of mainland Britain.

Many people will jump up and protest that these were good Catholics, but how wrong you are. These men like Saint Patrick, the establisher of Celtic Christianity and mission was a born again Christian and His followers were the same.

They held no alligance to Rome but their Lord Jesus alone.

Exodus 15:2,  Psalm 18:46,  27:1,  Romans 8:26-27,  Philippians 2:12,  3:3.

Blinkers. Part-Two.

Revival in England, Wales and Scotland.

When? They say that there has been no revival in Wales since 1904, England 1927 and Scotland 1849.” But this is not true, there have been more than one major out pouring of the Holy Spirit in each of these lands, but the majority of ‘Christians have refused to either see it or believe it.

It is not a Sectarian problem in the UK, it is a doctrinal problem. Belief in Doctrines, rather than the scriptures. The main doctrine of contention is replacement theology, the denial that God still loves His people Israel and their dispensation is separate from the Church.

The other is the acceptance of antinomianism, or the allowance of sin. This is why Homosexuality is accepted by many Christians, because it is no longer seen as a Sin.

So where are these ‘Revivals? 1924-27 in South-Wales, 1970 to 1991 in England and 1990 to 2007 in Scotland.   2 Chronicles 7:14,  James 4:9-10.

Celtic Saints. Part-Two.

St. David. March 1st.

We know very little about who Dawi Sant was? He was believed to have been born around 500AD in Caerfai, Pembrokeshire and died in 589AD. He was probably converted by an Irish missionary team, who arrived off south-west Wales 10-20 years after the death of Saint Patrick. The endeavour to reach the western parts of Britain were well underway by now.

David was canonized by Pope Calixtus in 1123AD. David may have been more than one person, who worked very hard in a very hostile environment to preach and teach. He is remembered by his famous words ( Gwnewch y pethau by chain) ‘Do the little things.’ It is claimed that St. David made pilgrimages to Rome and Jerusalem, but this is unlikely since the Celtic Church was hostile to Papal interferences.

A Cathedral in Saint Davids and a small church near by Glyn Rhosyn are attributed to him, while a stained glass window in  Clonard, Ireland records him as being the teacher of St. Finnian. Isaiah 61:10, Revelation 14:2, Psalm 23:4, 1 Timothy 4:8, Proverbs 30:24.

Saint Patrick. Part-two.

What we today know about this man, is generally from legends about him. But the historical facts show us that he was a very active and determined Christian believer, who wanted to evangelize a remote part of the northern region of the island of Ireland. Today known as the province of Ulster.

From landing at Saul in County Down and the establishment of that first cell Church there, he went on to reach out to the areas around Strangford Lough. But later in his life Greyabbey, Nedrum and Movilla were to be important centers of the new Celtic community. We learn a lot about him from his writings, about being delayed and held up by various tribes. We also see that other Christians for financial gains sold communities to pirates and slave traders. At the end of Patrick’s life he died in the Antrim hills and was returned to Bangor for burial.

It was the Normans who had his body dug up and moved to Downpatrick. Patrick has had an massive impact on Ireland and through the good works of nuns and priests in helping the people of Nigeria, they have adopted him as their patron saint too. It is from Patrick that later men and women went out from Ireland to Scotland, Wales, and Cornwall and many other places, probably of no return to serve their Lord and master Jesus.

Month of Saints.

March is upon us and its the month for Celtic saints. 1st March St. David, Wales, 5th, Saint Piran of Cornwall and the 17th Saint Patrick of Ireland. It was Patrick who really got the ball rolling for Christianity in the western fringes of the British Isles and NW-France.

All of these men risked life and limb to reach out to the pagan world around them. They brought hope and the promises of Jesus in relation to New Life and eternity. People in these societies had little hope and were much relient on pleasing deities, some times with human sacrafice. With great loss to the younger generation. But the impact of these saints has lated to this day and millions of people have been influenced for good over those generations.

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